Before we jump to conclusions…

Just who could be responsible for the Boston attacks?

As the dust settles in the aftermath of the Boston bombings, the search for answers, and culprits is already well underway. Naturally, the first suspicion of many will be Islamic extremists, either from or sympathetic to al Qaeda. But when one stops to consider the facts, this seems less likely. For one, the reportedly unsophisticated nature of the devices, and the fact that they appear not to have been suicide explosions seems unusual for an attack by Islamic terrorist groups. Furthermore the apparent lack of any prior intelligence indicates either a failure on the part of the relevant agencies, or more likely a so called ‘lone wolf’; a single individual acting alone, hence leaving much less of a trail. This individual could well be an Islamic fundamentalist. Or, if past attacks of this nature are anything to go by, the attacks are just as likely the work of a domestic extremist, likely of a right wing persuasion. Indeed, the attack is reminiscent of the 1996 bombing which occurred during the Atlanta Olympics, which was carried out by right wing extremist Eric Rudolph. Given the current political climate, a similar individual being responsible is in my view the most sensible conclusion.

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4 thoughts on “Before we jump to conclusions…

  1. Cadman Kelly

    I’m not picking on anyone’s faith, but I have to put this forward: could this be a Protestant extremist attack?

    Boston has a big Irish Catholic immigrant community, and there is a belief (true or not) that most of the IRA’s money came from Boston. Ireland was pretty crummy, so the money had to come from somewhere. This is absolutely no penalty against the people of Boston, who are innocent victims in this, clearly. But I wonder if maybe the Irish conflict has crossed the Atlantic. The Irish war left no clean noses, with atrocities committed by both sides (IRA vs UDA). It’s easy to imagine that diehards from either side still exist- whether they remain diehard enough to plant bombs is the question. Bag bombs (arming a bag and leaving it- apparently, what today’s attack was) were common during the Irish conflict.

    Reply
    1. ramblingsofapoliticsstudent Post author

      I feel that is highly, highly unlikely; the only dissident groups remaining which have actually attempted attacks recently are Republican, and these have been limited to Northern Ireland. The perpetrator is much more likely to be either someone angered by an issue such as gun control or some variety of anti government extremist (note April 15 is also the day tax returns are due in America, so the symbolic link would make sense), or one or a small number of Islamic militants not formally affiliated with a larger group (like a smaller version of those who carried out the London attacks).

      Reply
      1. Cadman Kelly

        The absence of attacks does not preclude the existence of a faction. We know there are active hard-right Islamist groups in Australia. When was the last attack by one of them? My point exactly. There have been big sectarian riots in Ireland fairly recently, admittedly not as bad as in the old days, but still a presence. This could be a new UDA fragment making itself known. That’s not my absolute conviction, but nothing’s confirmed yet.

  2. Yasemin S

    I just reckon the emphasis of this debate is misleading. As opposed to dwelling on the who dunnit’, we should deal with the response of the ‘relevant agencies’ and the broader context, as well as the response of the public. In the immediate aftermath and frenzy – before any serious investigation had taken place – right wing institutions like fox News and the New York Post jump on the arab muslims demonising band wagon, (falsely) assuming a ‘saudi national’ culprit. lets put to one side Erik Rush from Fox News’ tweet, that Muslims are “evil. Let’s kill them all.” Moving onto the state – the indefinite deployment of the National Guard and Special forces doesn’t bode well for the targeted and oppressed groups, nor does the implementationof random bag checks and raicial profiling fuled police hunt of a ‘darker skinned or black male’. The revamping of the War on Terror, in response to things like Israels continued loss of legitimacy, the arab spring/ syria etc. is clear when we see the US states response marred in anti-muslim racism. As far as civil liberties goes, an obvious crackdown is needed on the increasing number of strikes and civil resistance in boston and the surrounding area (I’m thinking most significantly of the Chicago Teachers fairy recently..) zoom back in again to the US, black incarceraton / police violence is at its highest levels in history> basic stats like more balck people are in prison today in the US than were under slavery..

    The focus on whether it was a terrorist or not not ignores the element of the structural oppression of non white people in America/ internationally, and you could say reinforces the rhetoric of the war on terror – fear generating about islamic extremism which clearly clouds heavy criticism american state. the unevenness created by racism means we should talk about the, cliced but true ‘opressors’, the american state not ordinary muslims, or non white people, in america.

    Reply

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